MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns

This MariaDB tutorial will discuss the execution of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns. Here we will discuss and draw lessons from several cases to help you comprehend the subject better. The whole list of subjects we’ll discuss is provided below.

  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns
  • MariaDB Order By 2 Columns
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns By Date
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Based on Condition
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns By Group
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Concat
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Descending Order
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Distinct
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns From Select
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Greater Than
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Having Same Name
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns In
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Join
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Limit
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Like
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Rank
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Update
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Year

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of syntax and an illustrated example.

In MariaDB, the ORDER BY clause is used to arrange the records of the COLUMN_NAME or EXPRESSION in ascending or descending order by using the ORDER BY expression [ASC | DESC]. Normally, the PROGRAMMERS don’t use the ASC keyword if they want to arrange the records in ascending order and MariaDB will automatically arrange them in ascending order if the ASC keyword is not used.

Whether we use the ASC keyword in the ORDER BY clause or not, it automatically arranges the records in ascending order. Here is the syntax of the MariaDB ORDER BY clause for the multiple columns in the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT EXPRESSION FROM YOUR_TABLE_NAME
WHERE [CONDITIONS]
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME_1 [ DESC | ASC ],
COLUMN_NAME_2 [ ASC | DESC ];

In the syntax explanation:

  • First, specify the one or more sort expressions as column_name_1, column_name_2 which we want to arrange in the order.
  • Then, we will use the ASC or DESC keyword to sort the rows in ascending or descending order in the result set. The ORDER BY clause used the ASC keyword by default.

Here is a sample example of the MariaDB ORDER BY clause by multiple columns in the table by the following query:

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STUDENT_ID, STUDENT_FIRSTNAME, STUDENT_LASTNAME FROM harvard_university
ORDER BY GENDER ASC ,
STUDENT_ID DESC;

In the preceding query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STUDENT_ID, STUDENT_FIRSTNAME, and STUDENT_LASTNAME columns from the HARVARD_UNIVERSITY table with the ORDER BY clause.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the records of the GENDER column in ascending order and the STUDENT_ID column in descending order by using the ASC and DESC keywords.

MariaDB order by multiple columns example
Example of MariaDB ORDER BY clause for multiple columns

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns” by using the ORDER BY clause on the HARVARD_UNIVERSITY table. We have used an example and explained it in depth, for better understanding.

Also, read: MariaDB Alter Table If Exists

MariaDB Order By 2 Columns

We will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the 2 columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME FROM STATES_OF_USA
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION ASC;

As we see in the above query, the SELECT statement is used to retrieve all records from the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the records of the STATE_SHORTFORM column in descending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in ascending order by using the ORDER BY expression [ DESC | ASC ].

MariaDB order by 2 columns example
Example of MariaDB ORDER BY 2 columns

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order by 2 Columns” by using the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Select Unique

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns By Date

In this MariaDB subtopic tutorial, we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table with DATE datatype and explained with the help of the following query:

EXAMPLE:

SELECT PATIENT_FIRSTNAME,PATIENT_LASTNAME FROM JOHNS_HOPKINS_HOSPITAL
ORDER BY PATIENT_ADMITDATE DESC,
PATIENT_DISCHARGEDATE ASC;

In the above query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records from the PATIENT_FIRSTNAME, and PATIENT_LASTNAME columns from the JOHNS_HOPKINS_HOSPITAL table with the ORDER BY clause.

In the ORDER BY clause, we have arranged the PATIENT_ADMITDATE column in descending order and the PATIENT_DISCHARGEDATE column in ascending order by following the clause as ORDER BY expression [desc | asc ].

MariaDB order by multiple columns by date example

We hope that you have understood how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the multiple DATE columns of the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Date Allow Null

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Based on Condition

In this MariaDB subtopic section, we will learn and understand how to use the ORDER BY clause for multiple columns and the WHERE condition of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

In MariaDB, the WHERE condition is used to filter the result set by using the SELECT, DELETE, UPDATE and INSERT statements. Let’s see the syntax of the MariaDB ORDER BY clause used with the WHERE condition for the multiple columns of the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT EXPRESSION FROM TABLE_NAME 
WHERE [CONDITIONS] 
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [DESC | ASC ],
COLUMN_NAME [DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME FROM states_of_usa
WHERE STATE_ID>=40
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION ASC;

As we see in the above query, the SELECT statement is used to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table with the WHERE condition. In the WHERE condition, the STATE_ID column is used with the GREATER THAN or EQUAL TO operator to find a value greater than or equal to 40 from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the STATE_SHORTFORM column in descending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in ascending order by using the ORDER BY expression [ DESC | ASC ].

If the WHERE condition turns out to be TRUE then the SELECT statement retrieves all records from the STATES_OF_USA table. But if the SELECT statement retrieves an empty record set from the STATES_OF_USA table and is executed successfully only when the WHERE condition gets a FALSE value.

MariaDB order by multiple columns based on condition example
Example of MariaDB WHERE condition and ORDER BY clause for multiple columns in the table

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Based on Condition” by using the MariaDB WHERE condition used with the ORDER BY clause for the multiple columns of the table by the query. For a better description, we have used a sample example and defined it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Select Where Not Empty

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns By Group

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB GROUP BY clause and ORDER BY clause by multiple columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

The group by clause in MariaDB divides a result’s rows into categories. The aggregate functions count()min(), max(), sum(), and avg() are frequently used with the group by function to obtain attributes of groups.

For example, the number of elements (count), the total of values (sum), the maximum element (max), the minimum element (min), and the average of elements (avg).

Let’s see the syntax of the MariaDB GROUP BY clause and ORDER BY clause by multiple columns of the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT  EXPRESSION FROM YOUR_TABLE_NAME
GROUP BY COLUMN_NAME
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [ DESC | ASC ], 
COLUMN_NAME_1 [ DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME, STATE_SHORTFORM,STATE_POPULATION FROM STATES_OF_USA
GROUP BY STATE_NAME
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION ASC;

In the aforementioned query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME, STATE_SHORTFORM, and STATE_POPULATION columns from the STATE_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the GROUP BY clause to group the STATE_NAME column and also used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the STATE_SHORTFORM column in descending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in ascending order by using the ORDER BY expression [ DESC | ASC ].

MariaDB order by multiple columns by group example
Example of MariaDB Order by Multiple Columns By Group

We hope that you have understood how to use the MariaDB GROUP BY clause used with the ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query. We have used an example and explained it in depth, for better understanding.

Read: MariaDB Check Empty String

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Concat

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB CONCAT function and ORDER BY clause for the multiple columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example and syntax.

The MariaDB CONCAT function is used to concatenate two or more two expressions together. Let’s see the syntax of the MariaDB CONCAT function and ORDER BY clause on the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT CONCAT(EXPRESSION_1, EXPRESSION_2, ... , EXPRESSION_N), COLUMN_NAME 
FROM TABLE_NAME 
ORDER BY EXPRESSION [DESC | ASC ], 
EXPRESSION [ DESC | ASC ]; 

EXAMPLE:

SELECT PATIENT_ID,GENDER,CONCAT(PATIENT_FIRSTNAME,PATIENT_LASTNAME) FROM johns_hopkins_hospital
ORDER BY GENDER DESC,
PATIENT_ID ASC;

In the preceding query, the SELECT statement is used to retrieve all records of the PATIENT_ID and GENDER columns from the JOHNS_HOPKINS_HOSPITAL table with the ORDER BY clause.

In the CONCAT function, it will concatenate the documents of the PATIENT_FIRSTNAME and PATIENT_LASTNAME columns from the JOHNS_HOPKINS_HOSPITAL table.

In the ORDER BY clause, it will arrange the records of the GENDER column in descending order and the records of the PATIENT_ID column in ascending order by using the ORDER BY expression [ DESC | ASC ].

MariaDB order by multiple columns concat example
Example of MariaDB Order by Multiple Columns Concat

We hope that you have understood how to use the MariaDB CONCAT function and ORDER BY clause for multiple columns on the table by the query. For a better understanding, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Check If Rows Exists

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Descending Order

In the MariaDB subtopic tutorial, we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on multiple columns in descending order of the table by the following query:

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME FROM STATES_OF_USA
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION DESC;

As we see in the above query, the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table with the ORDER BY clause. In the ORDER BY clause, we have used the STATE_SHORTFORM and the STATE_POPULATION columns in descending order by using the DESC keyword.

MariaDB order by multiple columns descending order
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Descending Order

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Descending Order” by using the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns with the descending order. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Insert Multiple Rows

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Distinct

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB DISTINCT clause and ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query. And which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example and syntax.

In MariaDB, the DISTINCT clause is used to remove the duplicate value of the column_name or expression by the SELECT statement. Here is the syntax of the MariaDB DISTINCT and ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT DISTINCT COLUMN_NAME, EXPRESSION
FROM TABLE_NAME 
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [DESC | ASC ] , 
COLUMN_NAME [DESC | ASC];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT DISTINCT STATE_NAME FROM STATES_OF_USA
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM ASC,
STATE_POPULATION DESC;

In the preceding query, the SELECT statement is used with the DISTINCT clause on the STATES_OF_USA table. In the DISTINCT clause, it is used to remove duplicate values of the STATE_SHORTFORM column from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the ORDER BY clause, it will arrange the STATE_SHORTFORM column in ascending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in descending order by using the ASC or DESC keyword.

MariaDB order by multiple columns distinct example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Distinct

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Distinct” by using the MariaDB DISTINCT and ORDER BY clause on the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Raed: MariaDB Greatest Function

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns From Select

Here, we’ll learn and comprehend how to use a query that returns several columns from a table in MariaDB using the SELECT statement with the ORDER BY clause and that will be clarified with the aid of an example.

EXAMPLE:

SELECT PATIENT_FIRSTNAME,PATIENT_LASTNAME FROM USA_ANTHEM_COMPANY
ORDER BY EMAIL DESC, 
GENDER ASC;

In the above query, the SELECT statement retrieves all records of the PATIENT_FIRSTNAME and PATIENT_LASTNAME columns from the USA_ANTHEM_COMPANY table with the ORDER BY clause.

In the ORDER BY clause, we have arranged the records of the EMAIL columns in descending order and the GENDER column in ascending order by using the DESC and ASC keywords in the query from the USA_ANTHEM_COMPANY table.

MariaDB order by multiple columns from select example
Example of MariaDB SELECT statement used with the ORDER BY clause for multiple columns

We hope that you have understood how to use the MariaDB SELECT statement with the ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Insert If Not Exists

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Greater Than

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause with the GREATER THAN operator on the multiple columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

SYNTAX:

SELECT EXPRESSIONS FROM YOUR_TABLE_NAME
WHERE COLUMN_NAME>VALUE
ORDER BY COLUMN_1 [DESC | ASC ],
ORDER BY COLUMN_2 [DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME FROM states_of_usa
WHERE STATE_ID>30
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION ASC;

As we see in the above query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table with the WHERE condition. In the WHERE condition, the STATE_ID column is used with the GREATER THAN operator to find a value greater than 30 from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the STATE_SHORTFORM and STATE_POPULATION columns in descending and ascending order by using the ORDER BY expression [DESC | ASC ].

If the WHERE condition turns out to be TRUE then the SELECT statement retrieves all records from the STATES_OF_USA table. But if the SELECT statement gets executed successfully and retrieves an empty record set from the STATES_OF_USA table only when the WHERE condition gets a FALSE value.

MariaDB order by multiple columns greater than example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Greater Than

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Greater Than” by using the MariaDB ORDER BY clause and GREATER THAN operator on the multiple columns of the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Not Between

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns In

Let’s learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause used with the IN condition for multiple columns in the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of syntax and an example.

In MariaDB, the IN condition is used to reduce the use of the OR condition for multiple columns in the SELECT statement. It is also used with the INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE statements.

SYNTAX:

SELECT EXPRESSION FROM TABLE_NAME
WHERE COLUMN_NAME IN ( VALUE_1,VALUE_2, VALUE_3,..... , VALUE_N)
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [ DESC | ASC ],
COLUMN_NAME [ DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME FROM STATES_OF_USA
WHERE STATE_ID IN (5,10,20,4,12)
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION DESC;

As we see in the above query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table with the WHERE condition. In the WHERE condition, the STATE_ID column is used with the IN condition to check the values like ( 5,10,20,4,12 ) from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the STATE_SHORTFORM and the STATE_POPULATION columns in descending order in the STATES_OF_USA table. If the SELECT statement retrieves all records from the STATES_OF_USA table only when the WHERE condition turns out to be TRUE otherwise vice-versa.

MariaDB order by multiple columns in example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns In

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns In” by using the MariaDB IN condition used with the ORDER BY clause on the table by the query. We have used an example and explained it in depth, for better understanding.

Read: How to use MariaDB Not Equal Operator

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Join

In this MariaDB subtopic tutorial, we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table with the help of the JOIN statement. And which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

In MariaDB, JOIN is used to merge the rows from more than one table based on common columns in tables. In other words, The data is extracted from more than one table into a single table using the JOIN clause.

  • The JOIN clause can be used when there are two or more two tables with common columns.

There are four types of JOIN in MariaDB:

  • INNER JOIN: It is a simple JOIN that retrieves all the rows from more than one table where the JOIN condition is True.
  • LEFT JOIN: It is a LEFT OUTER JOIN that retrieves all the rows from the left table based on whatever is specified in the ON condition and returns those rows from another table where the JOIN condition is True.
  • RIGHT JOIN: It is a RIGHT OUTER JOIN that retrieves all the rows from the right table based on whatever is specified in the ON condition and returns those rows from another table where the JOIN condition is True.
  • CROSS JOIN: It returns the result set where each row in a table is joined with each row in another table.

Let’s see an example of the MariaDB ORDER BY clause used with the JOIN statement on the table by the following query:

EXAMPLE:

SELECT SKULLCANDY_USA.SKULLCANDY_NAME, SKULLCANDY_USA.SKULLCANDY_USPRICE,
SKULLCANDY.NAME FROM SKULLCANDY_USA
INNER JOIN SKULLCANDY
ON SKULLCANDY_USA.SKULLCANDY_ID=SKULLCANDY.ID
ORDER BY SKULLCANDY.ID DESC,
SKULLCANDY.SKULLCANDY_ID ASC;

In the preceding query, the SELECT statement retrieves all records of the SKULLCANDY_NAME, SKULLCANDY_USPRICE and NAME columns from the SKULLCANDY_USA and SKULLCANDY tables. Then we used the INNER JOIN statement to join both tables SKULLCANDY_USA and SKULLCANDY.

And on the ON condition, we have used the EQUAL TO operator to match values of both the common column as SKULLCANDY_ID and ID from both tables’ SKULLCANDY_USA and SKULLCANDY.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the records of the ID and SKULLCANDY_ID in descending and ascending order by using the DESC and ASC keywords in the table.

MariaDB order by multiple columns join example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Join

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Join” by using the MariaDB ORDER BY clause with the JOIN statement on the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB COUNT Function

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Limit

We will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause used with the LIMIT clause for multiple columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

The MariaDB LIMIT clause is used to limit the number of records in the result set. Here is the syntax of the MariaDB ORDER BY clause used with the LIMIT clause on the multiple columns of the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT EXPRESSION FROM YOUR_TABLE_NAME
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [DESC | ASC ], 
COLUMN_NAME_2 [ DESC | ASC ] 
LIMIT LIMIT_NUMBER;

EXAMPLE:

SELECT STATE_NAME FROM STATES_OF_USA
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,
STATE_POPULATION ASC
LIMIT 10;

In the preceding query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table with the ORDER BY clause. In the ORDER BY clause, we have arranged the records of the STATE_SHORTFORM column in descending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in ascending order by using the DESC and ASC keywords.

In the end, we have used the LIMIT clause as LIMIT 10 to retrieve the first 10 records from the STATES_OF_USA table. It is normally used only when the user wants to see a short result set.

MariaDB order by multiple columns limit example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Limit

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Limit” by using the MariaDB ORDER BY and LIMIT clause on the table by the query. We have used an illustration and clarified it in depth, for better performance.

Read: How to load files into MariaDB

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Like

Here we’ll learn and understand how to use the MariaDB ORDER BY clause with the LIKE condition on the multiple columns of the table by the query. And which will be explained with the help of syntax and an example.

The LIKE operator is a logical operator in MariaDB that returns TRUE when any string matches the specific pattern provided with the LIKE operator. In other words, with the help of a like operator, we can test whether the string or expression matches the pattern.

If the string or expression matches with the pattern, then it returns TRUE otherwise FALSE. The pattern is used with the LIKE operator, and this pattern is called wildcards. Two wildcards are used with the like operator in MariaDB.

  • Percent(%): It is called a per cent wildcard that matches any string with any number of characters.
  • Underscore(_): It is called an underscore wildcard that matches any single character.

SYNTAX:

SELECT EXPRESSION FROM TABLE_NAME
WHERE EXPRESSION LIKE PATTERN 
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [ DESC | ASC ],
COLUMN_NAME [ DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT * FROM STATES_OF_USA
WHERE STATE_NAME LIKE 'A%'
ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC, 
STATE_POPULATION ASC;

As we see in the above query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records from the STATES_OF_USA table with the WHERE condition. In the WHERE condition, the STATE_NAME is used with the LIKE condition to find the alphabet A whose name ends with the alphabet A from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the records of the STATE_SHORTFORM column in descending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in ascending order by using the DESC and ASC keywords in the STATES_OF_USA table.

If the WHERE condition turns out to be TRUE then the SELECT statement will retrieve all records from the STATES_OF_USA table. But if the SELECT statement gets executed successfully and retrieves an empty record set from the STATES_OF_USA table only when the WHERE condition gets a FALSE value.

MariaDB order by multiple columns like example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Like

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Like” by using the ORDER BY clause with the LIKE condition on the table by the query. For a better explanation, we have used an example and explained it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Reserved Words

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Rank

In this MariaDB subtopic section, we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB RANK() function on the multiple columns of the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example.

The MariaDB RANK function is used to assign a rank to each row which is done within the partition by result set. And second, the ORDER BY clause is used to sort the rows within a partition by one or more expressions or columns.

EXAMPLE:

SELECT RANK() OVER (ORDER BY STATE_SHORTFORM DESC,STATE_POPULATION ASC) AS Ranking,
STATE_NAME,STATE_SHORTFORM,STATE_POPULATION
FROM STATES_OF_USA
LIMIT 10;

As we see in the above query, we have used the SELECT statement to retrieve all records of the STATE_NAME, STATE_SHORTFORM, and STATE_POPULATION columns from the STATES_OF_USA table. In the RANK function, we have ranked and arranged the records of the STATE_SHORTFORM in descending order and the STATE_POPULATION columns in ascending order.

In the end, we have used the LIMIT clause as LIMIT 10 to retrieve the first 10 records from the STATES_OF_USA table.

MariaDB order by multiple columns rank example
Example of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Rank

We hope that you have understood how to use the MariaDB RANK() function on the multiple columns of the table by the query. For a better illustration, we have used an illustration and demonstrated it in depth.

Read: MariaDB Rename Index

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Update

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB UPDATE statement with the ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query. And which will be explained with the help of syntax and an example.

The UPDATE statement is used to update the existing record of the column_name or expression from the table by the query.

SYNTAX:

UPDATE YOUR_TABLE_NAME
SET COLUMN_NAME= NEW_VALUE
WHERE [CONDITIONS]
ORDER BY COLUMN_NAME [ DESC | ASC ], 
COLUMN_NAME_1 [ DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

UPDATE STATES_OF_USA 
SET STATE_NAME=''
WHERE STATE_ID=54
ORDER BY STATE_NAME ASC,
STATE_POPULATION DESC;

In the aforementioned query, we have used the UPDATE statement to update and set a new value of the STATE_NAME column from the STATES_OF_USA table with the WHERE condition. In the WHERE condition, the STATE_ID column is used with the EQUAL TO operator to find a value equal to 54 from the STATES_OF_USA table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the STATE_NAME column in ascending order and the STATE_POPULATION column in descending order by using the ASC and DESC keywords in the query.

If the WHERE condition turns out to be TRUE then the UPDATE statement will update and set a new value for that column in the STATES_OF_USA table. But if the UPDATE statement gets executed successfully and doesn’t update a new value for that column in the STATES_OF_USA table then it happens when the WHERE condition gets a FALSE value.

We hope that you have understood how to use the MariaDB UPDATE statement with the ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query. For a better illustration, we have used an example and explained it in deepness.

Read: MariaDB Rename Table

MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Year

Here we will learn and understand how to use the MariaDB YEAR function with the ORDER BY clause for multiple columns in the table by the query, which will be explained with the help of an illustrated example and syntax.

The MariaDB YEAR function extracts the year portion value from the expression or column_name in the query. Here is the syntax of the MariaDB YEAR function and ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the following query:

SYNTAX:

SELECT YEAR(EXPRESSION | COLUMN_NAME), EXPRESSION
FROM TABLE_NAME 
ORDER BY EXPRESSION [ DESC | ASC ], 
EXPRESSION [ DESC | ASC ];

EXAMPLE:

SELECT YEAR (PATIENT_ADMITDATE), PATIENT_FIRSTNAME, PATIENT_LASTNAME FROM johns_hopkins_hospital
ORDER BY GENDER DESC,
PATIENT_ID ASC;

The MariaDB SELECT statement is used to retrieve all records of the PATIENT_FIRSTNAME and PATIENT_LASTNAME columns from the JOHNS_HOPKINS_HOSPITAL table, in the preceding query. In the YEAR function, it will extract the year portion value from the PATIENT_ADMITDATE column from the JOHNS_HOPKINS_HOSPITAL table.

In the end, we have used the ORDER BY clause to arrange the records of the GENDER column in descending order and the PATIENT_ID column in ascending order by using the ORDER BY expression [DESC | ASC ].

MariaDB order by multiple columns year example
Example of MariaDB Order by Multiple Columns Year

We hope that you have understood the subtopic “MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Year” by using the MariaDB YEAR function and ORDER BY clause on the multiple columns of the table by the query. For a better description, we have used an illustration and clarified it in deepness.

You may also like to read the following MariaDB tutorials.

By the end of this MariaDB tutorial to might understand the use of MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns statements after reading this lesson. We also discussed a few instances to help you comprehend the concept. Below is a list of all the topics we’ve covered.

  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns
  • MariaDB Order By 2 Columns
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple COlumns By Date
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Based on Condition
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns By Group
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Concat
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Descending Order
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Distinct
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns From Select
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Greater Than
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns In
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Join
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Limit
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Like
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Rank
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Update
  • MariaDB Order By Multiple Columns Year